SEOClerks

Indexing Infographics in search engines?



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Indexing Infographics in search engines?

Developing an Infographic takes a lot of design work and it's really time-consuming and after all that work you can only give it a file name and attach an alt tag with a keyword. Basically nothing different from normal images.

It's a pity from my point of view. The only solution I could find is somehow adding text below each infographic that contains its main keywords so that Google can understand what the infographic is all about.

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idealmike

Yep, you're right. You can spend a lot of time on an infographic. And Google still has no idea what's on the actual image. It can't read words on it although it is getting better at doing that now. Still though other than the rest of the text on the page, and by the alt tag or even title tag if you're using the image in a hyperlink, that and the meta information on the page itself, Google has no way of knowing what the image is of or is about. For example, you could write a page about SEO and then right in the middle of that page you could put an image of a chicken, a photo of a chicken coop or something, and provided you used an alt tag that said "Our SEO headquarters" or something or whatever, Google would have no idea that it's an actual photo of a chicken coop!

But that doesn't mean it doesn't have any effectiveness as an image. And for an infographic in particular. Because of the information that graphic contains that's what makes it valuable to your readers. So you do SEO on that image for Google by adding an alt tag and you can wrap text around that infographic as well giving even more of an ideal to Google what that image is about. That way if someone is searching for "SEOClerks infographics" for example, and you happen to have a webpage that is about SEOClerks infographics, then it's going to have a better chance of being listed and returned by Google in the SERPs.

The other thing of course is the EXIF data. Whenever you take a photo on your phone or your digital camera, EXIF data is saved with that image such as the date it was taken or even possibly the location and the author of it. You can use an EXIF data viewer and even find tools that allow you to change the EXIF data of images so that you can make sure they contain things like your name, your website address etc so that if they are shared around the Internet, Google can always see from that EXIF data who the original owner of it is.

Kinda bit of a strange coincidence this post actually because I just published a post on 6 SEOClerks Infographics that Explain SEOClerks in a Visually Pleasing Way. I hadn't really wrapped that much text around them but could only really give them all fairly unique alt tags and put some more text on the page to fill it out a little but also gave me a chance to put some other things that people might find valuable too.

But that's the way it goes infographic or not. You have to write for people not search engines. Indexing Infographics in search engines?




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EliteWriter

This post was interesting Cristian as it never occurred to me that infographics are not understood by Google as they are ultimately just images.Mike, you did a good job in explaining this. I think that it is a pity considering the amount of time one tends to spend to create an infographic, however I strongly believe that the true value of infographics lies in the fact that they help to explain concepts to readers more effectively than a chunk of text. So as long as an infographic is used in conjunction with a good article, you can still rank well, and also target readers and leave a good impact.




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Lynne

What about the EXIF data that Mike mentioned in my discussion about image SEO? Perhaps this will help with indexing infographics. I still haven't figured out how to do that but perhaps this will make a big difference?

I still want to get into cool infographics but I will so need to outsource this work, my design skills are not great and I don't think I will ever get much better.




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Cristian

Since you don't copy images from somewhere else and create your own infographic, I guess you don't need to rename the EXIF data Mike mentioned about.
The only solution I can think off is to explain or present the infograph content that contains the main keywords.




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Lynne

Very true, but surely you can add information to it, the details that you want showing? Maybe a keyword or your website?




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Corzhens

I agree that you have to be writing for people and not for the search engines. In one discussion there was the comment that he would be counting the keywords that he included in the content on a web page to make sure that he has enough keywords for the search engines. That clearly shows some people’s focus is now on search engines and not on the contents to be read by the users.




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