SEOClerks

Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?



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Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?

Hey guys,
During these last couple of days I've asked multiple questions about SEO, Ranking, Keywords and so on..

Take this site as an example. The website url is SEOClerks.com
The name is therefore SEOClerks.

That's what most of us would say in case we ever talked about SEOClerks. We would say SC or SEOClerks. And not "Oh, SEOClerks.com is cool". You get my point, right?

So, what I wonder is, would it be possible to actually rank your website url alone, as a keyword, without ranking any other keywords at all?

This question might sound weird and/or odd, and I'm sorry for that, if that's the case. I'm just curious to know. Let me know if I need to explain this in a better way Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?


Best Regards,
hitmeasap

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Cristian

Every website will rank for its name plus TLD I believe. For example, if I buy ilovecristian.com and type " ilovecristian.com" into Google, I'll probably be the first result. But since " ilovecristian.com" doesn't have any searches I may want to rank for "ilovecristian" (let's say this one does have monthly searches and quite the competition). It will be way more harder for me to rank for "ilovecristian" since other people are already targeting this keyword. I would have to create much better content and get some relevant backlinks. In the end I believe I will have the upper hand since I have the exact match keyword in my domain name.




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idealmike

Yes. When building backlinks to your site. You wouldn't want to use the same keyword over and over again as the anchor text. I think they say you should mix it up with your main keyword, synonyms of it, your brand name and your website URL as well.

According to SEMRush's post: What Is Anchor Text And How Can I Optimize It?

They have a breakdown of how much of each you should use


  • Branded Anchor text: 40%
  • Unique/Other anchor text: 25%
  • Naked link anchor: 15%
  • Brand + keyword anchor: 5%
  • Partial match anchor text: 5%
  • Generic anchor text: 1-5%
  • Long tail anchor text: 2-4%
  • Exact Match Anchors: Less Than 1%


And then if you do that, like that, your link profile will look more "natural". But you can't build the same type of link on every platform. Different platforms have different ways that you create a backlink on them. Example, forum profile links, directory links, citations and business listing directories, blog comment links, article marketing and guest posting (contextual) links etc etc. All of which have different ways that you can build a link and different ways of what you can put as the anchor text of those links.

Now if you was to build links using your sites domain name URL as the anchor text of those links. And only do that, well it might help your site rank a bit higher in the SERPs and you might rank for that URL if it was searched. But as you've said, nobody really searches for a URL. Although people do, when they know the site they want. But if you had a lot of good backlinks, Google would rank you high for that search term. But you might not rank as high for your targeted keywords had you not used them when building links. Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?

Hope that helps as a way to understand it. Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?

Mike.




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hitmeasap

Thank you Mike, I appreciate your answer as always! - So, another question, if I create a website about I don't know, let's say "dogs". And my website address is, "horses.com". Would I be able to rank "horses.com", and make "horses.com" appear in the search results, even if people searched for "dogs"? (Due to the "dog related content" on the site.)

Do you understand what I mean? Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?

And if people searched for "horses.com", would I also be able to show up in searches? - Even though I didn't use "horse", "horses" or "horse things" as keywords?

Man I totally suck at explaining this... Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?

I promise you, even though it might be a stupid or odd question, it doesn't sound this weird in my own head at least.... Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?




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idealmike

No yeah it's a fair question. Really it depends how big your budget is and how much you're paying. Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword? With enough money, anything is fairly possible. Although it can be manipulated through good SEO (onpage and offpage), Google makes the ultimate decision. The word within a URl plays such a massive role in how Google ranks that site. Remember the days of 100% EMD's? Well they still work today. But not as well. But even if your site was horses.com but the site had content on it about dogs. Google would still rank the domain name horses.com based on its current SEO score for it as it knows that word is related to horses. And it would see you have content about dogs on your site. Even though your site domain name is horses.com and then rank that content for things about dogs as it know what the content is about from the words. You see, every word you create, even single letters from A-Z or numbers from 0-infinity, already have their own SERP result. For words and phrases not yet created and written down somewhere on some website or blog, when Google does crawl and discover them, and then someone searches for them. Google will look at where it found those words first. (Google always ranks by order they were discovered by default). But then it would look at which sites that have those words, have the most links pointing to them that also have those words as the anchor text. And then rank the sites by order in which of those have the most of them. Generally. It also looks at and takes into consideration a lot more than that but nobody apart from a select few groups of people at Google know the exact algorithm. And that's somewhat sacredly secret territory. There's only so far you can go down that rabbit hole.

But so in answer to both queries. You would only rank for them, if you have them on your site somewhere. Whether it's in the domain name itself, some content on your homepage or in one of your blog posts or product pages or something. Then Google would rank you for it based on the above general described working process. Again hope that helps and answer more questions than it asks!




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hitmeasap

That's awesome Mike. Thank you very much for your reply. - I bet you'd be an awesome teacher. - Have you ever considered that? (Most of your replies are really awesome.)




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Everett

You can always try to rank http://example.com/ or example.com, and see what happens. I think it may be possible, as sometimes when I am entering keywords, you see the "Searches related to" section includes URLs, and even domain names themselves when you're not entering a domain name or URL. I think some people are doing this, but I also tend to believe that they do not properly understand what SEO is, or trying to rank something in hopes people will search for it. It could make you look foolish, but it could be good, that is if you want to rank for odd keywords..

I think I would be wasting my time to rank for the domain, or URL. I mean, the URL is already present within the search, and surely you will get a result if you entered just the URL, that is my thinking anyway. But back to this horses vs dogs keyword domain URL search term.. this would not go so well because your domain says something entirely different than what the content is actually about so you could probably "confuse" the algorithm and it will most likely rank on the content keywords, or it will have a negative impact because the content doesn't fit into the domain if that makes sense.




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Lynne

Andre from what I have heard using a keyword for your url is a great move, you can get some nice organic traffic in just from your url...

However just because you have that keyword in your url does not mean you will automatically be ranked #1 if you use that keyword. It might be a competitive keyword and of course that might mean that finding a keyword for your url that has a lot of organic traffic is not as easy as you think.

However when your website starts to rank and over time as your website gains in strength you should be ranked for it.

An example here is that if you type into Google "living with addiction" you will find my website on page 2 of Google with those keywords in my url. I get some organic traffic from that keyword Is it possible to rank your website url as a keyword?




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hitmeasap

"living with addiction" - First page and 6th place. - That's truly awesome Lynne! - I guess you've ranked higher since you wrote that. That's Incredible!




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vinaya

The domain name and site title (if it is different from the domain name) both matter in search engine ranking. I have published books on Amazon, I am on various social media sites, I have also published articles on various writing sites as well as my blogs. However, until recently, I did not have a personal website. I launched my website vinayaghimire.info. Before, I launched my website when ever I Googled my name, facebook profile and amazon profile would appear on the top, how my website is on #1 spot.




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Corzhens

I sometimes search for the URL when someone gives me a reference that is important like that one about the insulin plant. When I searched for the name of the site, I seem not to find it so what I did was to search for the URL. More often that not, the only difference between the site’s name and the URL is the suffix of the domain name directory if it is a dot com or dot net or any other dot.




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