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Exit Rate vs Bounce Rate



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Exit Rate vs Bounce Rate

I am struggling to understand the difference between an exit rate and bounce rate.

On one of my sites, it shows that visitors are not staying long. But I think that is because they are clicking on an ad to leave the site, so it's a bounce forward, not a bounce back.

Does Google see this too? Are all quick exits counted against me for search engine ranking? I need your help on this.

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seogurudev

Bounce rate is the percentage of people who landed on a page and immediately left. Bounces are always one page sessions.

Exit rate is the percentage of people who left your site from that page. Exits may have viewed more than one page in a session. That means they may not have landed on that page, but simply found their way to it through site navigation.



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jaysh4922

Exit rate means visitor who exits might have visited other pages on your site, but just exited on that specific page.or other hand Bounce Rate is the percentage of visitors that hit your website on a given page and don’t visit any other pages on your site. i would think google looks to see if you continue your search, going back to the google search results and looking at more sites.I really doubt that bounce rate make a different on SERP.



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focusphoto3

The definition of Bounce Rate is the percentage of visitors that hit your website on a given page and don’t visit any other pages on your site.
The definition of Exit Rate is the percentage of visitors that leave your site from a given page based on the number of visits to that page (or pageviews in some cases).
Both metrics are important in web analytics and can help online marketing people glean insights from the data, but they are definitely used differently. Bounce Rate is extremely important for determining how your landing pages perform as compared to visitor expectations.
Exit Rate is more important for determining which page in a process isn’t performing up to expectations.



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mgmshihan

At a glance
To understand the difference between Exit Rate and Bounce Rate for a particular page, keep the following points in mind:

  1. For all pageviews to the page, Exit Rate is the percentage that were the last in the session.
  2. For all sessions that start with the page, Bounce Rate is the percentage that were the only one of the session.
  3. Bounce Rate for a page is based only on sessions that start with that page.

In depth
Let's clarify this last point with a simple example. Your site has pages A through C, and only one session per day exists, with the following pageview order:

  • Monday: Page A > Page B > Page C
  • Tuesday: Page B > Page A > Page C
  • Wednesday: Page A > exit

The Content report for Page A would show 3 pageviews and a 50% bounce rate. You might have guessed that the Bounce Rate would be 33%, but the Tuesday pageview granted to Page A is not considered in its Bounce Rate calculation. Consider that a bounce is the notion of a session with only one interaction from the user, and the session-centric analysis answers a simple yes/no question: "Did this session contain more than one pageview?" If the answer to that question is "no," then it's important to consider which page was involved in the bounce. If the answer is "yes," then it only matters that the initial page in the session lead to other pageviews. For that reason, bounce rate for a page is only meaningful when it initiates the session.

Now let's extend this example to explore the Exit rate and Bounce rate metrics for a series of single-session days on your site.

  • Monday: Page B > Page A > Page C
  • Tuesday: Page B > Exit
  • Wednesday: Page A > Page C > Page B
  • Thursday: Page C > Exit
  • Friday: Page B > Page C > Page A

The % Exit and Bounce Rate calculations are:

Exit Rate:

  • Page A: 33% (3 of 5 sessions included Page A)
  • Page B: 50% (4 of 5 sessions included Page B)
  • Page C: 50% (4 of 5 sessions included Page C)

Bounce Rate:

  • Page A: 0% (one session began with Page A, but that was not a single-page session, so it has no Bounce Rate)
  • Page B: 33% (Bounce Rate is less than Exit Rate, because 3 sessions started with Page B, with one leading to a bounce)
  • Page C: 100% (one session started with Page C, and it lead to a bounce)



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lukasarrofi

At a glance
To understand the difference between Exit Rate and Bounce Rate for a particular page, keep the following points in mind:

  1. For all pageviews to the page, Exit Rate is the percentage that were the last in the session.
  2. For all sessions that start with the page, Bounce Rate is the percentage that were the only one of the session.
  3. Bounce Rate for a page is based only on sessions that start with that page.

In depth
Let's clarify this last point with a simple example. Your site has pages A through C, and only one session per day exists, with the following pageview order:

  • Monday: Page A > Page B > Page C
  • Tuesday: Page B > Page A > Page C
  • Wednesday: Page A > exit

The Content report for Page A would show 3 pageviews and a 50% bounce rate. You might have guessed that the Bounce Rate would be 33%, but the Tuesday pageview granted to Page A is not considered in its Bounce Rate calculation. Consider that a bounce is the notion of a session with only one interaction from the user, and the session-centric analysis answers a simple yes/no question: "Did this session contain more than one pageview?" If the answer to that question is "no," then it's important to consider which page was involved in the bounce. If the answer is "yes," then it only matters that the initial page in the session lead to other pageviews. For that reason, bounce rate for a page is only meaningful when it initiates the session.

Now let's extend this example to explore the Exit rate and Bounce rate metrics for a series of single-session days on your site.

  • Monday: Page B > Page A > Page C
  • Tuesday: Page B > Exit
  • Wednesday: Page A > Page C > Page B
  • Thursday: Page C > Exit
  • Friday: Page B > Page C > Page A

The % Exit and Bounce Rate calculations are:

Exit Rate:

  • Page A: 33% (3 of 5 sessions included Page A)
  • Page B: 50% (4 of 5 sessions included Page B)
  • Page C: 50% (4 of 5 sessions included Page C)

Bounce Rate:

  • Page A: 0% (one session began with Page A, but that was not a single-page session, so it has no Bounce Rate)
  • Page B: 33% (Bounce Rate is less than Exit Rate, because 3 sessions started with Page B, with one leading to a bounce)
  • Page C: 100% (one session started with Page C, and it lead to a bounce)



Yes ! i got the answer Exit Rate vs Bounce Rate thank you boss



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agarwalaman404

Bounce rate is the fraction of people who landed on a page and immediately left. Bounces are always one page sessions.

Exit rate is the proportion of people who left your site from that page. Exits may have viewed more than one page in a session.



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seojesica

This is potential Reply, Thanks.



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anirban09P

Bounce rate is the percentage of visits, who have entered on a particular page, go no further than that page during their session. Exit rate is a kind of bounce rate that doesn't care about how you got to the page. It still relies on some page being the last page viewed within the visit session however.



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Corzhens

Pardon me for my ignorance. I want to know how it is determined if the visitor clicked on my site’s link and brought to my web page. When he clicks out of my web page and goes to another site, what or who determines that? How do they know that the visitor had exited already? I have a penchant for opening several web pages of a site. Does that constitute an exit from the previous page? Take note that the previous page is still open while I am reading the second page.



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